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October 17, 2011

2

Vanishing on 7th Street

by Franz Patrick


Vanishing on 7th Street (2010)
★ / ★★★★

Paul (John Leguizamo), a movie theater employee with a big brain, found himself alone in the cinema after the lights mysteriously went out. The busy buzzing of movie-goers instantly turned to silence. As he explored the building, clothes were everywhere but there seemed to be no sign of people who were there just a split-second ago. It seemed too elaborate to be a prank. Rosemary (Thandie Newton), a mother with a missing baby, James (Jacob Latimore), desperate to find his mother, and Luke (Hayden Christensen), a news reporter, experienced a similar event. Written by Anthonu Jaswinski and directed by Brad Anderson, “Vanishing on 7th Street” started off with a chilling premise but the execution lacked energy because there wasn’t enough information about the weird events to get us to look beyond the images presented on screen. We, as well as the characters, learned that the shadow-like figures were afraid of the light. If touched by the creatures, they would vanish out of thin air. When the four characters got together in a bar owned by James’ mother, instead of finding creative ways to survive, they became laughably philosophical. They thought maybe they were in hell and being caught by the shadows was a way to get into heaven. Maybe there was some kind of an insidious biological warfare. Someone even brought up that maybe there was an alien invasion. Regardless of the reason, what made them so special (or not special) that they were left behind? Far too much time was dedicated on asking questions than seeking answers. With a running time of only ninety minutes, they couldn’t afford to stand around and wait for a light bulb to go off in their heads. Another issue I had with the picture was it took itself too seriously. The tone never changed. The formula involving someone’s light suddenly going off so conveniently just when he or she entered a pitch black room became predictable. It would have been more interesting if the film had found a way to laugh at itself to release some of the stagnant tension. For instance, when I saw clothes of random people just lying in the middle of the road and continued as far as the eyes could see, I laughed to myself. It was creepy but it was also somewhat amusing. As it went on, I was convinced “Vanishing on 7th Street” would have worked better as a short film. It just didn’t offer enough information. Where did the shadow figures come from? Where did everyone disappeared to? Why was the time of day growing shorter at such a rapid rate? We just didn’t know. There’s a mystery in not knowing certain things if and only if the material is already rich. That wasn’t the case here. Not giving away any answer to some of the biggest questions is, in my opinion, cheating the audiences.

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2 Comments Post a comment
  1. Oct 25 2011

    This film had way too many plot-holes and problems where it didn’t seem like they were talking about anything or even doing anything. The ending is also crappy and way too sympathetic. Nice review Franz.

    Reply
    • Nov 6 2011

      I don’t know how it got green-lit. Maybe it sounded like a good movie to make on paper.

      Reply

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