Skip to content

February 25, 2012

Palindromes

by Franz Patrick


Palindromes (2004)
★★ / ★★★★

In writer-director Todd Solondz’ ambitious “Palindromes,” young Aviva (Emani Sledge) woke up from a nightmare and was immediately consoled by her mother (Ellen Barkin). Aviva expressed her concern that she would turn out like her cousin, recently deceased Dawn Weiner, the main character from Solondz’ snarky, brilliant, hilarious “Welcome to the Dollhouse,” but her mother told her that she would never end up like Dawn. It was the moment when Aviva became fixated on the idea having a child. A couple of years later, Aviva was impregnated by Judah (Robert Agri). When her mother found out, she had no choice but to get an abortion. “Palindromes” had an excellent first half but had an unfocused and ultimately unrewarding second half. What made the first forty minutes so strong was Barkin’s relentless performance. She was highly amusing as the mother who tried to convince her child, no holds barred, into getting an abortion. The way the camera transfixed on her desperate eyes hinted at the possibility that not every word that came out of her mouth was the truth. Getting rid of the fetus was a priority. We start to think that maybe she cared more about her family’s image than Aviva missing out on having a life. We didn’t know for sure and I appreciated that it was never answered for us. I also enjoyed Solondz’ decision to cast Aviva using eight different actors. It added depth and questions in terms of why he used a certain girl to be in a particular scene. Did it have something to do with the shape of her body, her temperament, the color of her skin, or perhaps her hair? A boy played Aviva once. But why? However, what I found ineffective was when Aviva met Mama Sunshine (Debra Monk) and her adopted children who happened to have all sorts of diseases and disabilities. The family was devoutly religious. They turned to a higher power to give thanks, for guidance, and answers for their questions. I may not be religious but I understood why their faith was important to them. Prior to that point, the scenes lasted between three to five minutes. Such scenes quickly got to the punchline and it ended when it needed to. However, a lot of time was dedicated to Mama Sunshine and her family so the pacing began to feel disjointed. Furthermore, I felt like Solondz started to make fun of his characters instead of the circumstances that surrounded them and how we would react given that we were placed in Aviva’s situation. The conflict between abortion and religion failed to come into focus. The surprising act of violence toward the end was completely unnecessary and the picture began to spin out of control. It felt like it was done for mere shock value. I was surprised, in a negative way, because Solondz usually had control over his material. He had no trouble juggling controversial topics like pedophilia, emotional disorders, and wicked perversions because his characters always came first. This was an exception.

About these ads

What do you think?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Note: HTML is allowed. Your email address will never be published.

Subscribe to comments

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 922 other followers